Editorial de la Universidad de Jaén

Passionate Professing: The Context and Practice of English Literature

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Martín Alegre, Sara (2023). Passionate Professing: The Context and Practice of English Literature. Universidad de Jaén. UJA Editorial

Passionate Professing: The Context and Practice of English Literature

En Passionate Professing: The Context and Practice of English Literature Sara Martín estudia el nacimiento y desarrollo de esta disciplina en el Reino Unido y su adopción en España a partir de 1952. Martín también ofrece una selección de su blog The Joys of Teaching Literature (2010-) sobre la práctica de este campo en España e internacionalmente.

In Passionate Professing: The Context and Practice of English Literature Sara Martín studies the birth and development of this discipline in the United Kingdom and its adoption in Spain since 1952. Martín also offers selected posts from her blog The Joys of Teaching Literature (2010-) on the practice of this field in Spain and internationally.

Autor/a
Colección
Estudios Literarios Anglo-germánicos
Idioma
  • English
Editorial
UJA Editorial
EAN
9788491595489
ISBN
978-84-9159-548-9
Páginas
376
Ancho
15 cm
Alto
23 cm
Edición
1
Fecha publicación
31-12-2023
Número en la colección
4

Precio

Edición en papel
35,00 €
También disponible en

Sobre Sara Martín Alegre

  • Sara Martín Alegre
    Sara Martín is Senior Lecturer in English Literature and Cultural Studies at the Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, Spain. Dr Martín specialises in Gender Studies, particularly Masculinities Studies, which she applies to the study of popular fictions in English, with an emphasis ... Ver más sobre el autor

Contenidos

Preface: How to Read this Book

Glossary

Part I.English Literature: Definitions, Institutions, Theory

1. The Texts and Context so fEnglish Literature

1.1. English Literature and Literature in English

1.2. The Organization of English Literature as a Subject of Study:

       Periodization and Literary Movements

1.3. The Problem of Text Selection: Literary Genres and the Canon

2.. The Study of English Literature in Higher Education:

Institutionalization and Ideology

2.1. English in the United Kingdom and the United States

2.2. From English Philology to English Studies in Spain

3. Critical and Theoretical Models in the Study of English Literature

3.1. Literary Criticism, the Theory of Literature, and the Study 

       of English Literature: Needs and Limits

3.2. Modern Theoretical Models

3.3. The Literature Teacher and Literary Theory

Works Cited

Part II. From The Joys of Teaching Literature

- Starting a New Blog

- The Famous Brontë Sisters (or not so Famous)

- About the New MA Dissertations

- Books, Love, and Life

- Let Me Count the Hours

- Moodle Me up (or Is It Muddle Me up?)

- How Many Books Does It Take (to Know the Basics of Victorian 

  Fiction?)

- Faster, Faster…(Do Digital Resources Make Literary Research

  Easier?)

- Failed Expectations about Great Expectations

- Sexual Fantasies and Victorian Fiction

- Ideology and Aesthetics (Heart of Darkness Once More, Conrad’s

  and Others’)

- Marking Papers…(If You’re a Teacher, You Know What I Mean)

- Puzzling over the Use of Guides and Guidelines

- Growing Paranoia and Frustration (More on Marking Essays)

- A Sentimental Moment (A Student Says Thanks)

- A Strange Boast

- Class Etiquette: Respect for the Teacher at Work

Espabilation Skills, or How to Motivate Passive Students (part1)

Espabilation Skills, or How to Motivate Passive Students (part2)

- Testing, Testing, One, Two, Three…: Making Sure Literature Students

   Read Literature

- Teachers in July: Doing What, Exactly?

- It’s so Hot, so Hot: That Classroom Again!!

- Pretend Teaching: The Literature Classroom from the Teacher’s

  Perspective

- Power Pointless: Teaching Literature…by Reading

- Trashy, Trashed Campus: The Ugliest Sight

- Doing Gender Studies: For My Male Students

- Marking Papers: Communicating Vases

- In Your Own Words (or Not…): Using Google as a Writing Aid

- This Business of Coordinating a Degree

- Occupational Hazard: Yet Another Student Protest

- ‘Teacher, How Much Should I Learn?’: On Setting Limits to One’s Own Education

- By Decree: The New Teaching Workload

- A Sociology of Teachers: English Studies in Spain

- Spending Money on Drama (Working out the Cost of a Subject)

- On Plagiarising, again, with Some Recent Anecdotes (and a Pair of Louboutins)

- Elaine Showalter’s Joys of Teaching Literature

- ‘Proud of What You Don’t Know’: The Realm of Stupidity

- Running in Circles?: Online Teaching at UOC

- Considering Research and Nationality (and the Promptings of an Illustrious Visitor)

- ‘Bologna Well Applied’: What Was not Taken into Account Years Ago

- Theatre in Class: The First Desertion (and the Last One I Hope!)

- Applying Cultural Studies to Our Local Universities: It’s Urgent

- What Worries Me about the University (in This Week of Protests)

- Simply Puzzling: Why Are the (Academic) Skills We Teach so Soon Forgotten?

- Welcoming New Students: Why Mum and Dad Should not Be There

- ‘This Should Be about Me!’: Narcissistic Reading and the Problem of Choosing Books that Interest Students

- Learning to Be Less Afraid of the Narrator

- The Competences of the Teachers (but What about the Students?)

- How Marking Exams Feels and What They Seem to Indicate:

   The Divided Classroom

- Microplagiarism and Subconscious Plagiarism: The New Plagues

- Navigating Literature: A Few Pointers

- Some Archaeology: The Old ‘Licenciaturara’ in English Philology (Thinking of the 3+2 Reform)

- Class in the Classroom: Re-Starting the Conversation

- Working, Studying, and the Ever Rising Fees: Some Ugly Thoughts

- Media Exposure and the Obscure Professor in the Age of the YouTuber

- The Boomerang Effect: Why Marking Is so Exhausting

- Postmodernism Is Dead, Long Live Postmodernism: Seeking a New Label for the New Times

- Trying to Catch Up: A Book on Recent (Scottish) Literature

- Close Reading: The Problem of the Long Text

- The Risk of Rediscovering the Academic Wheel (and The Handmaid’s Tale)

- Tutoring TFG/BA Dissertations on Video Games in English Studies:

   The Walking Dead and The Last of Us

- (Not) Training Students for Jobs: Employability, Teamwork, Digital Technologies

- All That Resentment: University Teachers and Spanish Society

- Cultural Studies Revisited: A Bittersweet Feeling

- On the Brink of Collapse: Why Academic Careers Have Lost Their Appeal

- A Visit to the Library: The Sad Look of Yellowing Books

- Writing a PhD Dissertation: An Exercise in Resilience

- Thinking of the Next Academic Years under the Shadow of Covid-19: A Time to Reconsider What We Do as Teachers

Conclusions: English Literature, Present and Future

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